Tag Archives: Chicken House

Tales Quiz – Which Character From Who Let The Gods Out by Maz Evans Are You?


Who Let The Gods Out is currently sitting very high on my February TBR and from what I have heard already I’m in for a huge treat!  Maz Evans is super funny and I’m sure that her debut is going to make me smile from ear to ear.

Who Let The Gods Out? was released on the 2nd February 2017 published by the awesome Chicken House and is set to be a runaway success!

And it’s our #BritishBooksChallenge17 Debut Of The Month!

You can find out why people are loving Who Let The Gods Out here

So I teamed up with the wonderful Maz Evans and today we are asking….

Which Character From Who Let The Gods Out Are You?

And remember if you read, review and link up Who Let The Gods Out? for our #BritishBooksChallenge17  February link up here you will gain an extra entry into the February Prize Pack Draw!

Also do check out an awesome giveaway on twitter!


Elliot’s mum is ill and his home is under threat, but a shooting star crashes to earth and changes his life forever. The star is Virgo – a young Zodiac goddess on a mission. But the pair accidentally release Thanatos, a wicked death daemon imprisoned beneath Stonehenge, and must then turn to the old Olympian gods for help. After centuries of cushy retirement on earth, are Zeus and his crew up to the task of saving the world – and solving Elliot’s problems too?

You can buy a copy of Who Let The Gods Out here or from you local bookshop


Which character from Who Let The Gods Out are you most like? 

Take the quiz to find out and share your results with us on twitter or leave a comment.

If you cannot see the quiz below click here and scroll down


About Maz Evans

Maz’s writing career began in journalism as a TV critic and feature writer. She has written for many national titles and is a regular pundit on The Jeremy Vine Show. After working as a creative writing lecturer, she founded Story Stew, an anarchic creative writing programme that has visited primary schools and literary festivals around the UK, including Hay and Imagine. Maz lives in London with her husband and four children.

You can find out more about Maz on her website – www.maz.world

Or why not follow her on twitter – @MaryAliceEvans


Giveaway

With thanks to Chicken House I am also hosting a special giveaway on twitter to win 1 of 5 copies of Who Let The Gods Out here!


A huge thank you to Maz for playing along and helping to create this quiz!  And to Nina Douglas and Jazz at Chicken House for organising and the fab giveaway!

Have you read Who Let The Gods Out?  What did you think?  What was your favourite part?  If you have not read it yet have we tempted you to go and grab a copy?   I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of this review or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy!

Happy Reading!

Spotlight – Debut Of The Month – Who Let The Gods Out? by Maz Evans


I am so excited to have announced on February 1st that the super awesome Maz Evans is our #BritishBooksChallenge17 Debut Of The Month for February 17 with her debut Who Let The Gods Out?!

You can find out more about the #BritishBooksChallenge17 here

Who Let The Gods Out? was released on the 2nd Febraury 2017 published by the awesome Chicken House and is set to be a runaway success!

Who Let The Gods Out is currently sitting very high on my February TBR and from what I have heard already I’m in for a huge treat!  Maz Evans is super funny and I’m sure that her debut is going to make me smile from ear to ear.

I’m super excited to be shining the spotlight on Maz and Who Let The Gods Out today along with some love for Who Let The Gods Out from some lovely people.

And remember if you read, review and link up Who Let The Gods Out? for our #BritishBooksChallenge17  February link up here you will gain an extra entry into the February Prize Pack Draw!

Look out for a special Who Let The Gods Out post from Maz this February…..and there may even be a giveaway!


About Maz Evans

Maz’s writing career began in journalism as a TV critic and feature writer. She has written for many national titles and is a regular pundit on The Jeremy Vine Show. After working as a creative writing lecturer, she founded Story Stew, an anarchic creative writing programme that has visited primary schools and literary festivals around the UK, including Hay and Imagine. Maz lives in London with her husband and four children.

You can find out more about Maz on her website – www.maz.world

Or why not follow her on twitter – @MaryAliceEvans


About Who Let The Gods Out?

Elliot’s mum is ill and his home is under threat, but a shooting star crashes to earth and changes his life forever. The star is Virgo – a young Zodiac goddess on a mission. But the pair accidentally release Thanatos, a wicked death daemon imprisoned beneath Stonehenge, and must then turn to the old Olympian gods for help. After centuries of cushy retirement on earth, are Zeus and his crew up to the task of saving the world – and solving Elliot’s problems too?

You can buy a copy of Who Let The Gods Out here or from you local bookshop


Praise for Who Let The Gods Out?

I managed to catch some quotes from some lovely people about Who Let The Gods Out….


A huge thank you to the lovely Who Let The Gods out fan’s that provided me with quotes for this post.  Who Let The Gods Out comes highly recommend as our Debut Of The Month!

Look out for a special Who Let The Gods Out post from Maz this February…..and there may even be a giveaway!

And remember if you read, review and link up Who Let The Gods Out? for our #BritishBooksChallenge17  February link up here you will gain an extra entry into the February Prize Pack Draw!

Have you read Who Let The Gods Out?  What did you think?  What was your favourite part?  If you have not read it yet have we tempted you to go and grab a copy?   I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of this review or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy!

Happy Reading!

Tales Q&A with Ally Sherrick


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Today I am over the moon to have the wonderful author Ally Sherrick chatting about her debut book, Black Powder.

Black Powder was released on the 4th August in paperback published by Chicken House and is a brilliant historical YA fiction!

So today Ally chats about Black Powder, writing and being a debut author in this fab Q&A…..


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England, 1605. 12-year-old Tom must save his father from hanging. He falls in with a mysterious stranger – the Falcon – who promises to help him in exchange for his service. But on the long journey to London, Tom discovers the Falcon’s true mission – and a plot to blow up Parliament with barrels of black powder. Tom faces a terrible decision: secure his father’s release, or stop the assassination of the king … 


Hi Ally

 Welcome to Tales Of Yesterday.  I’m so happy to have you here!  The Gunpowder Plot is one of my favourite points in history!  I attended your historical panel at YA Shot and found it thoroughly fascinating.

Delighted to be here! Thanks so much for asking me. And so glad you enjoyed the YA Shot panel event. It was brilliant to be able to talk all things Tudor and Stuart with fellow history geeks, the lovely Jane Hardstaff (The Executioner’s Daughter) and Andrew Prentice and Jonathan Weil (Black Arts), and all in front of such a great audience too…

Can you tell us a little about Black Powder?

Of course! I’d love to! Black Powder is the story of 12-year-old Tom Garnett, whose father is arrested and thrown into prison for sheltering a Catholic priest. Tom sets out to try and save him and meets up with a mysterious stranger – the Falcon – who promises to help in exchange for his service. But on the long journey to London, Tom discovers the Falcon’s true mission – and a plot to blow up Parliament with barrels of black powder.

Tom is then faced with a terrible decision: secure his father’s release, or stop the assassination of the king …

What made you want to write a story centred on/around the Gunpowder Plot?

Well, first of all, the real-life plot itself is such a great story. It’s full of larger-than-life characters like Guy Fawkes and the leader of the plotters, the charismatic Robert Catesby; atmospheric settings such as the dark, dingy streets of London and the smelly, ink-black River Thames running through the city; and a twisty-turny plot which you really couldn’t make up if you tried.

But my story spark was the ruined Tudor mansion of Cowdray House deep in the Sussex countryside. On a visit to it, I discovered that a certain Mister Guy Fawkes had worked there as a young gentleman footman serving the rich and powerful Catholic Lord Montague. I was intrigued and pretty soon my head was buzzing with lots of what-ifs? What if a young boy on a desperate mission to save his father comes to Cowdray. And what if while there he meets a mysterious stranger bound for London who promises to help him…

Can you tell us a little about the main character Tom?

At the start of Black Powder, Tom Garnett is a young Catholic boy, living on the south coast of England with his mum and dad and baby brother, Edward. He’s looking forward to celebrating his 13th birthday in a few days’ time, but when his father rescues a Catholic priest and brings him home – which is against the law – Tom’s world is thrown into chaos and confusion. Though he loves his family very much and would do anything to protect them, he is also a little selfish and a bit impetuous too.  But by the end of the story, after the many adventures he has, I hope the reader will agree that it is his courage, resourcefulness and belief in the importance of doing the right thing that shine through.

Can you tell us a little about the mysterious Falcon?

Oooh, yes! But I’ll have to be careful not to give too much away. The Falcon’s true identity is one he keeps closely hidden. Tom thinks he’s a smuggler when he first meets him. And he doesn’t give Tom his real name, but instead encourages him to call him the Falcon, because of a bird-headed ring he wears on his little finger. But though he’s very much a man of mystery, he is also brave, strong and single-minded – though not always to the good as the reader and Tom will find out. Oh, and he has a sense of humour too…

Do any characters represent real historical figures from that time or have you used actual historical figures in the book?

My hero, Tom and my heroine, Cressida Montague, are characters I have made up – as are a number of others, like Tom’s family and neighbours. But there are plenty of characters I’ve based on real-life people, including Cressida’s great-grandmother, the Viscountess Montague. And although a number of the characters Tom meets later in the story have false names, they are based on real individuals living at the time of the plot too.  But I’ll say no more in case I give too much away!  For anyone who reads the book though, I spill the beans about who is who in a special section on the history behind the story at the end…

What was your favourite scene to write?

That’s a tricky one – there were so many! But I suppose if you pushed me, I’d have to say the scene where Tom first meets the Falcon in a secret tunnel under Cowdray House.

What was the hardest scene to write?

The hardest scene to write was probably the one when Tom is trying to escape from Cowdray after he’s been locked in his room by the old Viscountess. I wanted him to climb out of his window and shin down a nearby drainpipe – but as I’ve never done something like that myself (!!), I was having real difficulty trying to work out how he’d do it without falling: it’s quite a long way down. In the end I had to act it out in the room I was writing in to be sure he didn’t tie himself in knots

The good news was, no one saw me!

How much research was involved in writing this book?  Did you already know a lot about the subject or did you discover new things along the way?

I think all historical fiction requires a fair bit of research if you’re going to try and get the broad facts right and create as authentic a feel as possible for the period you’re writing. Like most writers of this type of fiction, I used a mix of sources including books on the topic of the Gunpowder Plot and life in Jacobean England and historical documents from the time – some of which are now available online. And I also visited places associated with my story. Cowdray of course, which was my original inspiration. But also other houses associated with the Gunpowder Plotters such as Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire. I also trod the route that Tom and the Falcon took when they arrived in London – crossing London Bridge (no heads on spikes above it these days!) and walking along Fleet Street and down the Strand to the Palace of Westminster – the scene of the crime and near Guy Fawkes’ place of execution too.

I knew a fair bit about the plot already, having read a fascinating account of it by the novelist and historian, Antonia Fraser (The Gunpowder Plot: Terror and Faith in 1605). But there are always things to find out along the way, which is what makes writing historical fiction such fun! And some things, like the ‘ruffler’ – a type of 17th century conman – even made it into the story. Though you have to be careful not to overload what you’re writing with too many facts or it can end up reading like a history text book instead.

What was your favourite or most intriguing historical fact you discovered whilst researching for Black Powder?

Gosh, that’s a tricky one! There was so much I learned on the way. But one thing in particular I found mind-boggling, which was that in the day, because of the way it was built, London Bridge had a set of rapids flowing beneath it. And young men of the daring/foolhardy kind liked nothing better than to ride them in small boats. A sort of early form of white-water rafting I guess. Though apparently quite a few of them drowned in the process and ended up at the bottom of the River Thames – something I have the Falcon tell Tom when they cross the bridge into London.

That is really fascinating!  I have an obsession with the Tower myself!

We would love to know a little bit more about you!  Can you give us 5 random facts we don’t know about Ally Sherrick?

  1. I wanted to be an Egyptologist and dig up mummies when I was at primary school. Hmmm. Come to think of it, maybe I should write a story about that…
  2. My first cat was called Cindy – she was black and white and a bit of a scratcher, but I still loved her (I think!!)
  3. Before I went to university, I was an au-pair for a few months. I lived with a family in the Ardennes mountains in southern Belgium where one of my duties was to feed the family hen, a large, mean-eyed bird called Duchesse, who also had a very sharp beak.
  4. My favourite type of sweet is liquorice – particularly liquorice ‘Catherine wheels’ and pipes.
  5. My favourite book of all time is Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. My favourite children’s books are Skellig by David Almond and A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.

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What is your favourite part of history?

Well besides the Ancient Egyptians, I’m rather partial to the Anglo-Saxons…

Did you always want to write historical fiction?

I thought I might quite like to. But actually, my first full length story – not yet published (never say never!) – was a science fiction one all about a boy and his young brother who live above the last seed bank on earth…

Who is your favourite historical figure?

Hmmm. A tricky one! *Scratches head* I’ve always been rather drawn to Captain Scott of the Antarctic – though now I know more about that other great explorer, Sir Ernest Shackleton, I might be tempted to say him instead. At any rate they were both extremely brave, though some may call them heroic failures…

Do you have any strange writing habits?

Nothing terribly strange, other than a lot of fiddling around with other things (the internet, filing, looking out of the window) before getting on with the actual business of writing. But from what I can make out, talking to other writers, that’s quite a common complaint…

What have you learnt from being a debut author?

That if you want to get published, it’s all about the three ‘p’s. Persistence, perseverance and perspiration. Oh, and a smidgeon of luck too… And then, if you are lucky enough to get a publishing deal, that the hard work continues, but that you can draw lots of comfort from the fact that your publisher is right there alongside you because, like you, they want your story to be the best it can be.

Growing up who inspired you into writing?  Are there any Authors or books that inspired you?

I had several very encouraging and inspirational teachers who believed in me and told me I was a good writer too. And like most writers, I was a real bookworm and read all sorts. Joan Aiken was a particular favourite author of mine. I loved the blend of fantasy and history in stories like her The Wolves of Willoughby Chase. And there was also plenty of dark menace too. You can’t beat a bit of dark menace!

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What historical fiction would you recommend?

There’s not been a huge amount of it about for quite a few years, which I think is a real shame. However, just recently a number of stories with a historical setting are starting to come through again, so perhaps things are starting to change? I hope so! History makes such brilliant stories. Of course a number of the great classic tales are still very much available. The likes of Carrie’s War by Nina Bawden and Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian for example. And for slightly older readers, Tanya Landman’s more recent and brilliant Buffalo Soldier about a young runaway slave girl in the American West who joins a regiment of African-American soldiers and goes off to fight in the so-called Indian wars.

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Could you tell us a little about what you’re writing next?

Yes. My next story is another historical one, but this time it’s set during the Second World War and follows the fortunes of George Penny, a young evacuee who is sent to live in the Suffolk countryside with a mean relative. It’s a tale of buried treasure, Nazi spies and a plucky hero and heroine doing their best to save the country from disaster. Oh, and there’s an Anglo-Saxon ghost in it too… But if you want to know more, I’m afraid you’ll have to wait until Chicken House publish it in spring 2018!

Thank you so much for being here today Ally and answering all of my questions!  Black Powder sounds amazing and your passion for historical fiction had made me smile lots!

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Black Powder by Ally Sherrick is out now in paperback (£6.99, Chicken House)

Find out more at www.chickenhousebooks.com

You can buy a copy of Black Powder here or from your local book shop


About Ally Sherrick

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Ally Sherrick loves exploring ruined castles and decaying mansions and imagining what it must have been like to live in them without electricity and hot and cold running water – although she’s quite glad she doesn’t have to herself!

She has a BA in medieval history and French from Newcastle University and an MA in Writing for Children at the University of Winchester.

She is married and lives with her husband and assorted garden wildlife in Farnham, Surrey. Black Powder is her first novel.

You can find out more about Ally on her website – www.allysherrick.com

Or why not follow her on twitter – @ally_sherrick


A huge thank you to Ally for answering so many of my questions and to Laura at Chicken House for organising.

Have you read Black Powder?  What did you think?  Do you love the Gunpowder Plot?  What do you like about it? Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of the page or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy !

Happy Reading!

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Tales Q&A with Kerr Thomson


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I am super excited to be a part of the UKYACX Extravaganza Blog Tour again and today I have been paired up with the brilliant Kerr Thomson winner of the Times Children’s Fiction Prize 2014!

This time around the UKYACX Extravaganza is taking place in Newcastle on the 17th September 2016 and is featuring all of these amazing authors and illustrators!

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Today I have been lucky enough to have put some questions to Kerr and he was kind enough to answer them all…..


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Three children are spending their summer on a wild Scottish island. Fraser is desperate for adventure; Hayley is fed up she’s even there; while Dunny spends his days staring out to sea. He hasn’t said a word in years. But everything changes with the discovery of two bodies on the beach: a whale and a man. Fraser and Hayley see a mystery-adventure to be solved, but Dunny is inconsolable. And in the end, it will take someone who listens to the sea to put it right.

You can read an extract from the book here


Hi Kerr.  It’s so wonderful to have you here today!

Can you tell us a little about your debut that was released last year, The Sound of Whales?

The Sound of Whales is an adventure story set on the Scottish island of Nin. Fraser and Dunny are island brothers, the younger one Dunny doesn’t speak. On to their island comes Hayley, an American girl who at first despises everything to do with the place, especially Fraser. Together they discover dead bodies and castaways in caves and whales and the special gift that only Dunny possesses.

You won the Times Children’s Fiction Prize 2014?  How was that?

That was amazing! I entered with no expectation of winning and it was the first place I ever sent The Sound of Whales. There is no large pile of rejection letters from agents and publishers and I am very aware of how lucky I am. That is the wonder of the competition – unknown writers like myself are given the most fantastic opportunity to be published. And it can happen to anyone!

Can you tell us a little about the main characters in The Sound of Whales, Fraser, Hayley & Dunny?

Fraser is an island boy looking for adventure and not realising he is living it every day.  Dunny is his younger brother who is autistic and mysterious and remarkable in many ways. Hayley is an American girl dragged by her mom to the island and determined to hate every minute of the experience. None of them can resist the adventures that come their way and the friendships that develop.

How important was the setting to you?  Why did you choose the setting of a Wild Scottish Island?

The island is almost a character in itself. Certainly the landscape plays a very important role in the story. There is something inherently dramatic and enigmatic about that place where the ocean meets the shore. And of course, the best and worst thing about an island is, you can’t get off!

What was your favourite scene to write?

The second last chapter began life as the last chapter and I always had that scene in my head. It is an ending of sorts though I don’t want to spoil it for anyone yet to read the book (You know who you are!). Writing it, having brought the story all the way there, was such a satisfying feeling. It ended as I had hoped it would end. That may seem a strange thing to say as its writer, but sometimes the words take on a life of their own and head in a different direction from anticipated and so I was glad the story finished as I hoped it would!

Do you see yourself in any of the characters in The Sound of Whales or have you used any of your own experiences in the story?

They do say every author writes themselves into their first book so I suppose there is a wee bit of me in every character….although maybe not the orcas – don’t have that killer instinct!

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As for using my own experiences in the story, well I’ve never swam with whales or sailed a boat or discovered a dead body but I have been frightened and I have been excited and I have been lonely and I have been angry and I have been brave and I have been flabbergasted and I have experienced all these important feelings that the young people in the book experience. So I guess that counts.

If you could cast your characters from The Sound of Whales in a big Hollywood film adaptation who would you choose?

If I told you that then readers would have that image in their head and I would rather people created their own visual image of the characters as they read. So no mention of Ewan McGregor and Idris Elba…ah, darn!

What would you like your reader to take from The Sound of Whales?

I would like young people to believe in the possibility of adventure. I fear that no-one goes exploring anymore. Young people of today have this fantastic resource to enrich their lives which is sadly completely neglected. It’s called ‘outside’!

What do you think makes a good story?

It’s a simple formula – believable characters doing exciting things in an interesting place. Works every time.

We would love to know a little bit more about you!  Can you give us 5 random facts we don’t know about Kerr Thomson?

No-one who answers this question ever gives random facts. They carefully craft five pieces of highly exaggerated if not downright fanciful snippets that make the person seem incredibly interesting, slightly mysterious but also modest and charming! I’m dull. I’ll pass.

Which of your characters would you most like to spend the day with?

Well Ben would take me for a boat trip to find whales and then we would have to fight our way through a storm to get back to harbour so that sounds like a day to remember.

Growing up who inspired you into writing?  Are there any Authors or books that inspired you?

Reading is the thing that inspired me to write. Every writer of books starts off as a reader of books. The earliest books that I loved were the Hardy Boys and Willard Price’s Adventure books. American kids foiling spy rings and wrestling crocodiles and flying biplanes. I doubt the books have aged well but at the time I devoured them and craved adventures of my own. Eventually I started writing the adventures instead of just imagining them.

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Are there any recent works or authors that you admire or books you wish you had written?

Every time I read a good book I wish I had written it. Wizards, vampires, survival in dystopian worlds…..every sub-genre that arises you say to yourself, why didn’t I think of that?!

What are you currently reading?

Strangely I am reading Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. My eight year old son, Samuel, has just discovered the joys of Hogwarts and now wants intricate conversations about the minutiae of wizardry. I can’t remember any of it so I am starting again.

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What is your favourite book of 2016 so far?

It is not a new book. A reviewer likened The Sound of Whales to something written by Eva Ibbotson and I hadn’t read any of her books so I thought I would. I really enjoyed Journey to the River Sea.

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Are there any authors you would like to collaborate with?  Who?

I have never tried it but I am not sure how a collaboration would work. I’m a bit of a lone wolf when it comes to writing.

When starting a new book or idea what does your writing process look like?

I sketch out a rough plan of a story but all pretty vague and then I just start writing. I usually have a detailed ending worked out, the ending is the most important bit of a book, but I don’t like to be too fixed in the story. New ideas will inevitably come as the plot develops.

Do you have any strange writing habits?

I really don’t. I sit in front of my laptop and press the keys. I would love to have a Dahlesque shed but I just sit in the dining room with the door shut. I do get some of my best ideas when I am out running.

Recently I asked some lovely authors their thoughts about does music influence their books or their characters.  Did music have any influence the story of The Sound of Whales?

I like to have a movie soundtrack or smooth classics on Classic FM playing in the background but not too intrusive. Mood music I suppose. How much influence it has on my writing is probably minimal.

Are there any exciting plans for the rest of 2016 or 2017 I saw you’re writing your second novel The Rise of Wolves?  Can you tell us a little about it?

The Rise of Wolves is set on the same island of Nin but a different group of young people having an adventure of their own. No whales this time but there are wolves. Wolves on a Scottish island? Unlikely, I hear you cry. Ah, but now you’re intrigued!

Also in 2017 the American version of The Sound of Whales is published. Change of title, however. I believe it is now going to be called Washed Ashore. It’s a little strange to have a different title but apparently it is not unusual. I am not going to be precious about it.

And finally…are you excited about the UKYACX Extravaganza?

Anything that is an Extravaganza must be exciting! It will be so cool to hang out with all these authors and meet all the readers and book lovers who attend. Slightly intimidating as well. I keep thinking I am going to be found out!

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You can buy a copy of The Sound Of Whales here


About Kerr Thomson

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Kerr Thomson is a teacher of geography at Cathkin High School in Glasgow, and is the father of a six-year-old son and three-year-old daughter.

After studying geography at universities in Glasgow and Arkansas he worked at various jobs in various places including hospitals, sports centres and country parks, but eventually could resist no longer and entered the teaching profession, which is something of a family business. He has taught in several schools in Manchester and the west of Scotland.

He enjoys cycling and runs an occasional half-marathon. In every place and at every time he has always written stories.

You can follow Kerr on twitter – @kerrthomson


Blog Tour

You can catch up or follow the rest of this fab blog tour at the following stops!

And don’t forget to buy tickets for this fab event!

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You can find out more about the UKYACX Extravaganza in Newcastle on the website here

Or follow them on twitter using @UKYACX

Or find out what we got up to at the Birmingham UKYA Extravaganza here

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A huge thank you to Kerr for being fab and answering all of my questions!

Also a huge thank you to Kerry Drewery and Emma Pass for organising the UKYACX Extravaganza and having me on the blog tour!

See you there!

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Guest Post – The Secret’s Out! – Cooking Is For Everyone by Laurel Remington


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I am super excited to have the wonderful Laurel Remington Winner of the Times Children’s Fiction Competition 2015 and author of the scrumptious The Secret Cooking Club on Tales today!

The Secret Cooking Club was released on the 4th August 2016 published by Chicken House and with the Bake Off starting last night I think this will be the perfect book to fill the time between episodes and beyond!

A huge thank you to Laura for sending me a copy of the book and for organising this fab guest post today!

So today Laurel Remington tells us how cooking is for everyone…..

And it really is…..not only did Laura organise this fab blog post today but she set me a challenge….to bake a rainbow cake!


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Twelve-year-old Scarlett is the star and victim of her mum’s popular blog – the butt of school jokes, she’s eager to stay firmly out of the spotlight. But one evening, she finds a gorgeous kitchen in the house next door, left empty by an elderly neighbour in hospital. As Scarlett bakes, she starts to transform her life, discovering new friends and forming the Secret Cooking Club. But can she fix her family, seal her friendships and find the mysterious secret ingredient?


Chelley’s Rainbow Cake

So last weekend I recruited by hubby and my son into the kitchen and we had a great time making this rainbow cake!

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I know right?! I can’t believe we made this either!  It was so much fun!

We followed this receipe here over on kerrycooks.com ( @kerrycooksblog ) for the sponges and made our own butter cream topping.

Using Kerry’s step by step receipe made this really easy to use and the cake tasted delicious!

Anyway here’s a little video of us making it!

Enjoy!


The Secret’s Out! – cooking is for everyone

At the end of August, the new series of The Great British Bake-off will kick off, bringing to the fore a new group of talented and hopeful bakers. Unlike shows that involve celebrities (chefs or non-chefs), I think much of the appeal of GBBO comes from the fact that the contestants are ordinary people – people like you and me – emerging from their ordinary kitchens, and doing something extraordinary.

I’m not a good cook – I don’t pretend to be, and I don’t harbor a secret urge to become one. All of my ‘free time’ is spent writing, and while I try to make healthy meals for my kids, I’m not a very good role model in that regard. I do, however, like to bake. I love decorating birthday cakes for my girls, and I like baking pies, Christmas cookies and gingerbread houses. I use simple recipes, and am not particularly experimental – but that’s okay, right – as long as it works! I sometimes let my girls help out, but to be honest, I’m not very patient at tolerating the inevitable mess.

The Secret Cooking Club is a book about friends, family, improving relationships, and, of course, good food! Despite my own inadequacies in the kitchen, I knew I wanted my main character, Scarlett, to form a secret club involving cooking and baking. Cooking is an activity that can bridge the gap between the generations, and is something that everyone can learn.

And . . . we all have to eat, don’t we?

While my original draft centered on the activities of a group of girls, I quickly expanded the cast to include, among others, a boy member of the club. I am very much in favour of the modern push to teach about cooking and healthy eating in schools to all children. The days when women cook and men go off to work is SO long past. Also, cooking can be a great creative outlet. I personally know of a great many men who love to cook (alas, not my partner!). And just look at how many men are on GBBO and do amazingly well!

In addition to a boy, the club also includes an elderly neighbor who becomes the mentor of the girls and their cooking. One of the important elements of ‘middle grade’ literature is about children forging their own identity, and taking the first independent steps to become teenagers and young adults. For many books in this age group, adults are dead, absent, or otherwise someone to ‘get out of the way’ so that adventures may be had (and mischief can be made!).

As a writer, I am interested in exploring ways to bridge the gap between children and adults through understanding, and compromise on both sides. I became a first-time mum in my late 30s, and became much more attuned to how different things are for kids these days than when I was growing up. Mobile phones, the internet, Disney films on-demand – countless things that make life both better and worse. While my daughters aren’t teenagers yet, I realized that I was going to have to adapt to their world in order to relate to them.

In The Secret Cooking Club, the girls learn compassion by helping with the plight of their neighbor, and in return, her influence helps Scarlett improve her relationship with her mum and other adults. There is so much that older people and younger people can learn from each other – I hope that this book helps to plant the seed that it really is possible and worthwhile to make the effort.

Most of all, I hope that young readers enjoy reading my book, and that it inspires them to believe in themselves and try something extraordinary – whether it involves cooking, baking or something else that they love.

Good luck to all the contestants on this year’s GBBO, and I look forward to seeing your amazing creations! Maybe I’ll even take a risk and try to make something myself . . . !

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You can buy a copy of this book here


About Laurel Remington

Laurel Remington (JoJo Cooper Photography)

Laurel Remington is a writer of children’s, teen, and women’s fiction. Originally from Eureka, California, she now lives with her family in Surrey, and is Deputy General Counsel for a renewable energy company.

Her debut novel, The Secret Cooking Club, was the winner of the Times/Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition 2015. The novel was inspired by her three young daughters, who love to cook (and eat!) anything sweet.  When she’s not cleaning up the kitchen after them, she can usually be found working on her next novel.

You can find out more about Laurel on her website – www.laurelremington.com

Or why not follow her on twitter – @LaurelRemington


A huge huge thank you to Laurel for such a brilliant post and to Laura at Chicken House for organising!

Have you read The Secret Cooking Club?  What did you think?  Are you intrigued?  Will you gve the Rainbow Cake a try?  What else do you like to bake?  I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of this review or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy!

Happy Reading!

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Guest Post – My Writing Journey by Louise Gornall


Under Rose-Tainted Skies

I am super excited to have been asked to be part of the blog tour for this wonderful book Under Rose Tainted Skies by Louise Gornal .

Under Rose Tainted Skies was released on the 7th July published by Chicken House and I have heard the most amazing things about this book already!

A huge thank you to Nina Douglas and Chicken House for having me on this wonderful tour.

For my stop on the blog tour I have a wonderful guest post from the super lovely Louise talking about her writing journey!


Under Rose-Tainted Skies

Available in three different shades of pink (supplied at random). Agoraphobia confines Norah to the house she shares with her mother. For her, the outside is sky glimpsed through glass, or a gauntlet to run between home and car. But a chance encounter on the doorstep changes everything: Luke, her new neighbour. Norah is determined to be the girl she thinks Luke deserves: a ‘normal’ girl, her skies unfiltered by the lens of mental illness. Instead, her love and bravery opens a window to unexpected truths …


My Writing Journey

Good morning, guys! If you’re sitting comfortably, I’d like to tell you all a little bit about my… unconventional writing journey.

 I had only been writing a few years before I got my agent. In the interest of full disclosure, I did have a book published before Rose, but we don’t talk about that because there is a ton of smog and uncertainty surrounding my former publisher. (If you would like to read about what happened though, you can find a post about it here.)

 So, I didn’t have a manuscript ready to query, but I saw an open call on Twitter from Mandy Hubbard. Mandy wasn’t looking for a manuscript, she was looking for the right voice to write a story that she really wanted to read and try to sell. I auditioned with a 5 page sample, didn’t think anything of it at the time. Mandy was a big agent, and my writing still felt weak. A couple of months after I submitted, I was at the computer, trying to get a new book down, when I got an email. I almost fell off my chair when I saw it was from Mandy. She told me she loved the voice in my sample and then asked if I’d be up for moving on to the next round of auditions, which would mean her giving me an outline and me writing 5k. I thought about it for all of 0.5 seconds before I said, YES. HELL YES!

 I watched my inbox solidly, for about four weeks after that. It would be a week after thanksgiving when I next heard from her. And guess what? She loved my new 5k sample and asked if she could call me. Call me… as in ‘The Call’. Though, I’m naturally a pessimist, and at the time, it never occurred to me our chat would end in an offer or representation. WHICH IT DID!

 Alas, we tried real hard, but the first story I wrote didn’t sell. That hit hard because I was under the delusion that an agent automatically meant book deal. It doesn’t. Be prepared. But happily, the second book I wrote would sell in six days…and the rest, as they say, is history.

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You can buy a copy of Under Rose Tainted Skies here or from your local bookshop.


About Louise Gornall

Louise Gornall

Louise is a graduate of Garstang Community Academy, and she is currently studying for a BA (Hons) in English language and literature with special emphasis on creative writing. A YA aficionado, film nerd, identical twin, and junk food enthusiast, she’s also an avid collector of book boyfriends. Her debut novel, Under Rose-Tainted Skies, will be published in July 2016.

You can find our more about Louise on her website – www.bookishblurb.com

Or why not follow her on twitter – @Rock_andor_roll


Blog Tour

Catch up of follow the rest of this fab blog tour at the following stops!

URTS blog tour


A huge huge thank you to Louise for such a fab guest post and to Nina Douglas and Chicken House for organising!

Have you read Under Rose Tainted Skies?  What did you think?  Are you intrigued?  I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of this review or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy!

Happy Reading!

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Guest Post – The Inspiration Behind The Apprentice Witch by James Nichol


 

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I am super excited to have been asked to be part of the blog tour for this brilliant debut middle grade book, The Apprentice Witch by James Nicol.

Ever since I first heard about this book it became high up on my list of most anticipated books for 2016!

The Apprentice Witch was released on the 7th July 2016 published by Chicken House.

A huge thank you to Laura from Chicken House for having me on this wonderful tour and for sending me a copy of the book.

For my stop on the blog tour I have a wonderful guest post from this wonderful author, James Nicol about the inspiration behind The Apprentice Witch!


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Arianwyn fluffs her witch’s assessment. Awarded the dull bronze disc of an apprentice – to the glee of her arch-rival, Gimma – she’s sent to protect the remote, dreary town of Lull. But her new life is far from boring. Turns out Gimma is the pompous mayor’s favourite niece – and worse, she opens a magical rift in the nearby forest. As Arianwyn struggles with her spells, it’s soon clear there’s much more than her pride at stake …


The Inspiration Behind The Apprentice Witch

The Apprentice Witch is all about a young witch, Arianwyn Gribble, who on the brink of becoming a fully-fledged witch fails her evaluation test due to a dark secret she has harboured for many years, and has to remain an apprentice for a little bit longer. She’s sent to serve the remote community of Lull. But even before she arrives she discovers the town is not quite as quiet as she first thought. And when an old adversary arrives in town…well it all gets very interesting indeed!

Stories of magic and adventure filled my childhood, I was scared of lots of things as a child. The dark, thunderstorms, most grown-ups, most other children for that matter…basically everyone! But somehow reading books like The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe or A Dinosaur Called Minerva where ordinary children did brave and wonderful things, made me feel that I could perhaps be brave as well. I think the power of books to do this is just amazing and almost from that point I wondered what it might be like to be able to inspire someone in that way, though I don’t think I ever thought in a million years that I might write a book one day.

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But when I started to think about writing something, many years later, and aiming to have it be published that idea was there about magic and bravery and adventure and I wanted to try to harness some of that wonder and courage that C.S. Lewis had stirred in me as a young reader. I think it’s very important for children to be able to read about situations that are familiar to them, it helps them to understand. But sometimes the more important thing that books can offer is a total escape from whatever it is they are trying to deal with!

I knew from quite early on that my story was going to be about a witch, who better to wield magic in a story? But all those brilliant witches I knew from a lifetime of reading were sort of waiting there, daring me to try and write a book about a witch. I’d already decided that my witch was not going to be the black hat, cat owning, cauldron stirring witch we have come to know and love. I wanted my witch to be a helpful person, someone who was already trained in how to be a witch and was about to go out into the world to serve a community, like a public servant, somewhere between a sheriff and magical pest control. And then I had a very clear image in my head of a scene and my main character – that doesn’t now even exist in this way in the finished novel, but it was my starting point and a key piece of pure unexpected inspiration:

“There was a small flash of energy as the magical wards connected and formed the required protection around the cottage and the garden. Arianwyn Gribble looked over to the garden gate, her broom stick was propped casually there, its lantern sending out a dusty glow like fine starlight.

The apprentice witch had arrived…”

I wrote those first two pages in a hurry, frightened that the image in my mind would fade before I had captured it with ink and paper. And then I sat and looked at it and thought, OK so who is this witch?

Why is she here?

And what on earth is going to happen next?

Developing the story from there was a joyous exploration of my own imagination, collecting bits and pieces from all over to help feed the story and build the world. I had always loved to hear my two grandmothers tell me their stories of life during the 1930s and 1940s including what they had both done during the Second World War. To me that time seemed like something from a story, far away, both alien and similar to the world I knew. And the more I delved into the World of The Four Kingdoms the more I started to take from that time period. I wanted a world that felt familiar and yet not somewhere that was not too modern where magic would seem an impossibility, even in a fantasy world.

I have always loved myths and legends since seeing ‘Clash of the Titans’ as a young child and these helped to populate the story with a cast of suitably magical creatures, some good, but most bad!

Inspiration is a funny thing, unexpected and random (sometimes to the point of frustration!)

You never know when it will strike, what form it will take or where it will lead you and your story. But be open to it and don’t search for it too hard or you might scare it away. When it comes embrace it and make sure you have a notebook handy!

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The Apprentice Witch by James Nichol (£6.99, Chicken House)

You can buy a copy of The Apprentice Witch here or from your local book store.

You can also read an extract from the book here


About James Nicol
James Nichol Author photo lowres

James Nicol has loved books and stories his whole life. As a child he spent hours absorbed in novels, watching epic 1980s cartoons or adventuring in the wood at the bottom of the garden. He lives on the edge of the Cambridgeshire Fens with his partner and a black cockapoo called Bonnie.

You can follow James Nicol on twitter – @jamesnicol or on Facebook here


Blog Tour

Catch up of follow the rest of this magical blog tour at the following stops!Apprentice Witch blog tour (1)


A huge huge thank you to James for such a fab guest post and to Laura Smythe for organising!

Have you read The Apprentice Witch?  What did you think?  Are you spellbound?  I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of this review or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy!

Happy Reading!

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Spotlight – The Girl Of Ink And Stars by Kiran Millwood Hargrave


51aD9I0DJuL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_The Girl Of Ink And Stars is the breath-taking YA debut by Kiran Millwood Hargrave and is released today, 5th May 2016!

Happy Book Birthday Kiran!

I am beyond excited to read this book!  I have heard phenomenal things about it already and I have an absolutely stunning proof copy which I cannot wait to read.

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The Isle of Joya was inspired by Kiran’s own trip to La Gomera!

So with it being release day and as the sun is shining Chicken House are asking people to tweet their favourite place they’ve been to (or would like to go to!) and why with the hashtag #GirlofInkandStars

I’m going to share mine too!

First here is a little about the book…..


51aD9I0DJuL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Forbidden to leave her island, Isabella dreams of the faraway lands her cartographer father once mapped. When her friend disappears, she volunteers to guide the search. The world beyond the walls is a monster-filled wasteland – and beneath the dry rivers and smoking mountains, a fire demon is stirring from its sleep. Soon, following her map, her heart and an ancient myth, Isabella discovers the true end of her journey: to save the island itself.

You can buy a copy of The Girl Of Ink And Stars here


About Kiran Millwood Hargrave 

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Kiran Millwood Hargrave is a poet, playwright and novelist. Her debut novel THE GIRL OF INK AND STARS is out in the UK with Chicken House Books in May 2016, and in the USA with Knopf in July under the title THE CARTOGRAPHER’S DAUGHTER.

Kiran graduated with distinction from Oxford University’s Creative Writing MSt in 2014. She was born in London in 1990, and now lives in Oxford with mad artist boyfriend and mad writer friends.

or find her on tumblr, add her books on Goodreads, or like her page on Facebook.


Some Of Chelley’s Favourite Places

West Bay

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© Photo Credit Kevin Toy All Rights Reserved

I love this place.  It is the most beautiful little seaside town which was made famous because of the brilliant TV show Broadchurch.  My family and I try to go here at least once a year and upon driving into the small little harbour town I instantly feel my body relax.  We normally stay in a little chalet that over looks the sea and on warm evening we sit on the beach and breathe in the salty fresh air.  When feeling energetic my husband has been know to climb that cliff there…. whilst I smile and wave from the bottom with ice cream in hand! Yum!

London

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Another favourite place of mine is London!  I love it.  I love a walk along the river bank or a visit to the tower especially on a gorgeous sunny day.

Arley

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This little village and some of it’s surrounding areas is where I spent a lot of my weekends as a child and it holds so many memories for me.  Every time I visit here is sweeps me up and cuddles me with love and it always makes me smile.  Always.  It’s that beautiful and I love it that much that I have used some of it as the setting for my current WIP.

Chelley xx


So there you have it!  Three of my favourite places!

Do join in by sharing your favourite place you have been to (or would like to go to!) and why with the hashtag #GirlofInkandStars

Have you read any of The Girl Of Ink And Stars?  What did you think?  If not are you excited?  I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of the page or tweet me on twitter using @ChelleyToy

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Guest Post – The Great Chocoplot – Author Interview of Jelly & Gran by Chris Callaghan


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Happy Easter Everyone!

Today I’m so excited to be featuring a chocolate filled guest post from hilarious debut author Chris Callaghan!

The Great Chocoplot was released on the 3rd March 2016 published by Chicken House books and is a brilliantly funny and quirky novel centering around the horror of all horrors: a chocopocalypse!

The Great Chocoplot was discovered through Chicken House’s Open Coop and is the first book to have been discovered and published following the, now yearly, open submissions.

So today we thought we would do something a little different…..what better Easter treat than letting the author of this wonderful chocolate adventure, Chris Callaghan, interview his own characters –  young Jelly, the protagonist, and her Gran.!

Yep!  You heard me right!

So grab those Easter Eggs, relax and enjoy!


Layout 1Jelly and her family live in Chompton-on-de-Lyte, where everyone loves a Chocablocka bar or two. So when the end of chocolate is announced, she can’t believe it. Determined to investigate, Jelly and her gran follow a trail of clues to a posh chocolate shop and its owner, the pompous Garibaldi Chocolati. Gari’s suspiciously smug, despite his failing business and yucky chocolate. Is it really the chocopocalypse, or is there a chocoplot afoot?


The Great Chocoplot – Author Interview of Jelly & Gran

 Chris: Hello Jelly and … er, is it OK if I call you Gran?

Gran: Yes, of course dear. But don’t expect any birthday presents!

Chris: Fair enough. Can I start by asking how it feels to be in a book?

Jelly: Strange. Very strange. And weird.

Gran: I’m an author myself, you know. A long time ago.

Jelly: Yeah, Gran was a scientist and had science stuff published.

Chris: Really? That sounds very interesting, but about ‘The Great Chocoplot’, for those who have not read the book, could you tell them a little about it.

Jelly: Well, it all starts with an announcement on ‘The Seven Show’ …

Gran: Oh, I don’t watch that. Ever since your dad ‘fixed’ my telly, I can’t get that channel. I wish he’d leave things alone.

Jelly: Yeah, well, on ‘The Seven Show’ a professor found an ancient prophesy that said in six days there would be no chocolate left in the world!

Chris: And how did you feel about that?

Jelly: Well, it was proper crazy. We thought it couldn’t be true at first. But then over the next few days, things started happening and chocolate became harder to get hold of.

Gran: People went raving bonkers! It was embarrassing.

Jelly: Yeah, and they had to call in the military …

Chris: Probably best if we don’t give too much of the story away here.

Gran: Well, I haven’t read it. I’ve heard that there’s mention of my knickers!

Jelly: Yeah, there is! (Giggles)

Gran: There was no need for that sort of thing.

Chris: And you are on the cover of the book, Jelly.

Gran: Not me though. No, no. They put old snobby-pants-what’s-his-face on it.

Jelly: Garibaldi Chocolati.

Gran: Don’t say his name, dear. I don’t want to hear it.

Chris: So, would you recommend that people should read this story?

Jelly: Don’t know. If they want to, I suppose. It’s a bit silly.

Gran: I wont be reading it!

Chris: That’s all we have time for … thank you for talking to me. And I hope you enjoy being in your very own book!

Jelly: You’re welcome, I’m sure we will.

Gran: Do we get a free copy?

Layout 1The Great Chocoplot by Chris Callaghan out now in paperback, for 7+ year olds (£6.99, Chicken House) www.chickenhousebooks.com 

You can buy a copy here or why not visit your local independent bookshop!


About Chris Callaghan

Chris Callaghan

Chris’ first job was on a Pick ‘n’ Mix counter, followed by a career in the Royal Air Force as an aircraft mechanic. Even though fully trained on how jet fighters work and fly, he still suspects that there is a little magic involved somewhere.

Then as an Environmental Scientist he spent a lot of time getting wet on factory roofs, measuring pollution. He left all that behind to become a Stay At Home Dad where his brain began fizzing with stories. His wife and daughter kept insisting that he wrote some of these stories down. So he did.

You can find out more about Chris by visiting his website – www.chris-callaghan.com

Or why not follow Chris on twitter – @callaghansstuff


A huge thank you to Chris for a fab post and to Laura at Chicken House for organising!

Have you read The Great Chocoplot?  What did you think?  Who was your favourite character?  What is your favourite chocolate that you couldn’t live without?  Why not leave a comment using the reply button at the top of the post or tweet me on twitter using @chelleytoy !

Happy Reading and eating lots of chocolate!

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Guest Post – All Time Favourite Funny Books by Tom Ellen & Lucy Ivison


Never Evers

I have been lucky enough to have received a copy of this fab book, Never Evers, which is the second book by the hilarious duo Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison.

Released on the 7th January 2016 and published by Chicken House I have heard wonderful things about this book and I simply cannot wait to read it.

I feel completely honoured to be featuring a brilliant guest post from these two wonderful authors with their all time favourite funny books!

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Without further ado I will hand you over to Tom and Lucy…


Never Evers

Kicked out of ballet academy and straight into a school ski trip, Mouse knows certain classmates can’t wait to see her fall flat on her face. Meanwhile, Jack looks forward to danger and girls, but hasn’t a clue about either. That’s until French teen sensation Roland arrives in the resort – who Jack’s a dead ringer for. When Roland persuades Jack to be his stand-in for a day, Jack, in disguise, declares his feelings for Mouse. But what happens when he’s no longer a pop star – will it be music and magic on the slopes?


All Time Favourite Funny Books!

Lucy & Tom

TOM

At Swim-Two-Birds – Flann O’Brien

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Probably my all-time favourite book, this is the story of a dishevelled, permanently drunk, Dublin student who tries to write three different novels, only to find that his characters start getting away from him and embarking on lives of their own. It switches between insane fantasy and brilliantly grubby reality, and contains such amazing lines as: “My uncle went out to the hall, sending back his voice back to annoy me in his absence”.

Complete Prose – Woody Allen

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These days he’s best known for churning out one not-very-good film per year, but back in the late Sixties/early Seventies, Woody Allen wrote a series of surreal, strange and ridiculously funny pieces for the New Yorker, all of which are collected in this book, and all of which are properly amazing. There’s the (fake) history of the man who invented the sandwich, a (fake) excerpt from the memoirs of Hitler’s hairdresser, and a (fake) description of ‘mythical beasts through the ages’ (including one terrifying creature which, according to Woody, has “the head of a lion, and the body of a lion – though not the same lion”).

 Molesworth – Geoffrey Willians & Ronald Searle

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I read this when I was probably about 13 or 14, and it was the first time I realised a book could be capable of causing uncontrollable laughter. It’s the story of Nigel Molesworth, a scruffy, over-imaginative, and usually quite grumpy, public schoolboy, who talks the reader through all aspects of his life, from how to get avoid the craziest teachers, to how to attract girls. As well as finding it extremely funny, I also remember (as a 13-year-old) being struck by how deep it was, since it contained lines like: “History started badly and hav been gettin steadily worse” and “Grown ups are what’s left when skool is finished.”

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Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding

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Bridge is basically Georgia Nicolson all grown up. Massive pants, unfortunate fancy dress, general making a twit of herself  in front of hot men; this book has absolutely everything you could want from a comedy novel…

 Jeeves & Wooster – PG Wodehouse

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One of the great comedic partnerships: upper class, nice-but-dim toff Bertie Wooster and his unflappable, stoic butler, Jeeves. Wodehouse puts them in all sorts of ridiculous scrapes, and every story is brilliantly funny. Watch the Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry, if you haven’t already!

 Love In A Cold Climate – Nancy Mitford

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“’But I think she would have been happy with Fabrice,’ I said. ‘He was the great love of her life, you know.’
Oh, dulling,’ said my mother, sadly. ‘One always thinks that. Every, every time.”

I didn’t really know that classic novels could be funny until I read Nancy Mitford. She is probably my all time favourite writer. I have read Love In A Cold Climate and The Pursuit Of Love dozens of times. Her one-liners are the best around.

Never Evers

Never Evers by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison is published by Chicken House, priced £6.99 

You can buy Never Evers here or why not visit your local independent bookshop

A huge thank you to Tom and Lucy for such a brilliant blog post.


About Tom Ellen & Lucy Ivison

Lucy & Tom

Lucy Ivison, lives in London and is a school librarian who runs an online teen magazine, Whatever After, as well as teaching in girls’ schools across London specialising in building confidence and creativity.

Tom, currently living in Paris, is a journalist and has written for ShortList, Time Out, Vice, talkSPORT, ESPN and Viz.

You can follow Lucy on twitter – @lucyivison


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Catch up on the rest of the blog tour by checking out the blogs above!

Another huge thank you to Tom & Lucy for a brilliant guest post!

Also a huge thank you to Maura at Chicken House for asking me to feature this and for sending me the book for review!

Have you read Never Evers?  What were your thoughts?  Are you intrigued to read this book after reading this post?  I would love to hear from you!  Why not leave a comment by using the replt button at the top of the page or tweet me on twitter using @ChelleyToy

Happy Reading

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